On Nov. 14th, 2018, I purchased an exercise video online. The online ad advertised the merchandise for about ~$25 shipping included. While checking my credit card I notice that on the day of purchase they had charged my account twice ($33.00 and $5.28) and they had me set up for a monthly subscription without my permission. This monthly subscription was going to cost me $50.11 a month. On November 27th I called Clickbank and made them aware that I never received the merchandise I ordered and that I never signed up for a monthly subscription. They sent me an email with a refund for my future monthly payment of the supposed subscription which I never asked for, but they didn’t refund me for the merchandise I never received. So, I called my credit card company to ask for a charge back on the merchandise charges and they credited my account.

 John Holloway uses Amazon affiliate links exclusively on his Guitar Lessons website. He advises beginning bloggers to “try different things and see what works best. Some best practices to start with are image links, in-text links and even product comparison tables with links,” says Holloway. “Just make sure that the linking is natural and not overdone or you run the risk of driving visitors away.” 

Was on the Instagram site a few weeks ago and ran across an offer for a free backpack. The ad mentioned there would be a shipping fee of $14.95. Not sure why, but I went ahead and placed an order. The shipping charge ended up being taxed, which I thought was a little strange. The backpack arrived within a week and although the shipping notification showed the order as being shipped by Fed-Ex, it was actually delivered by the USPS. Today, this company charged my credit card an additional $53.00, saying the backpack offer was really a 15 day trial and as it wasn't returned in time, they were "finalizing" the sale. Of course, the offer I found on Instagram is now long gone. I called them to complain and was talked to like I was a small child. Please avoid this company!

Career blogger Amanda Formaro of AmandasCookin’ says “the Amazon affiliate program is a terrific fit for new bloggers, but it’s important to understand that Amazon only pays you when your readers make purchases.” Formaro emphasizes that Amazon doesn’t pay affiliates for simply listing products or ads on their site. “Amazon affiliates don’t earn money for sending visitors to Amazon or the number of Amazon ad impressions that appear on an affiliate’s website,” says Formaro. “It’s all about the sale.”


It's especially true now that the big media players are finally waking up to affiliate marketing (NYTime buying WireCutter and SweetHome) and BestReviews (which was already an epic product review site in it's self due to the fact they built their own 10,000 sq ft testing lab) being acquired by Tronc (owns the LA Times and half a dozen more publications).
On 4th Feb 2019 I accepted an offer for a free book. I entered my CC details as requested to process the offer (note that the page showed that there would be no charge for the book (including shipping). The process became onerous with a multitude of irrelevant marketing offers that I refused. On exiting the site, I received an email for some books that I never requested which would be shipped at a cost of US$10.17. The email that was sent does not allow me to reverse/challenge this charge. The charge to my CC was made by CLKBANK*COM. This is a SCAM!

Clearly, knowing which pages are the most popular on your site is important to your affiliate monetization strategy. This data helps you target your affiliate efforts to the pages that already attract the most readers. Once those pages are well-monetized, you can look into improving the search results, reader interaction and monetization of less popular pages.
James Goodwillie of the blog One To Multi agrees. “I’ve been an Amazon Associate from day one, and it’s the number-one way I monetize my content. I’ve found that things like big sections of product image links are too much and scare away users,” says Goodwillie. “Adding affiliate links for product pictures or any text where I mention the product is the method that works the best for my site.”

It's especially true now that the big media players are finally waking up to affiliate marketing (NYTime buying WireCutter and SweetHome) and BestReviews (which was already an epic product review site in it's self due to the fact they built their own 10,000 sq ft testing lab) being acquired by Tronc (owns the LA Times and half a dozen more publications).
Disclaimer: Reviews on FitSmallBusiness.com are the product of independent research by our writers, researchers, and editorial team. User reviews and comments are contributions from independent users not affiliated with FitSmallBusiness.com's editorial team. Banks, issuers, credit card companies, and other product & service providers are not responsible for any content posted on FitSmallBusiness.com. As such, they do not endorse or guarantee any posted comments or reviews.
×