Was on the Instagram site a few weeks ago and ran across an offer for a free backpack. The ad mentioned there would be a shipping fee of $14.95. Not sure why, but I went ahead and placed an order. The shipping charge ended up being taxed, which I thought was a little strange. The backpack arrived within a week and although the shipping notification showed the order as being shipped by Fed-Ex, it was actually delivered by the USPS. Today, this company charged my credit card an additional $53.00, saying the backpack offer was really a 15 day trial and as it wasn't returned in time, they were "finalizing" the sale. Of course, the offer I found on Instagram is now long gone. I called them to complain and was talked to like I was a small child. Please avoid this company!
Career blogger Amanda Formaro of AmandasCookin’ says “the Amazon affiliate program is a terrific fit for new bloggers, but it’s important to understand that Amazon only pays you when your readers make purchases.” Formaro emphasizes that Amazon doesn’t pay affiliates for simply listing products or ads on their site. “Amazon affiliates don’t earn money for sending visitors to Amazon or the number of Amazon ad impressions that appear on an affiliate’s website,” says Formaro. “It’s all about the sale.”
Now, Amazon’s categories can be confusing. As you use the program, you’ll find that something that you’d consider a “Home” or “Luxury Beauty” item might be categorized at a lower rate. To be sure of the item’s commission category, check the categories listed at the top of the item page or search by category as we did here to find this Luxury Beauty item: 

If your visitor clicks on one of your affiliate links, say for the beauty cream above, but purchases another brand of cream or even a blender or pair of shoes during their visit, you get paid a commission on those items too. In fact, Amazon’s affiliate links track the shopper from your site to that of the shopper. If he or she completes a purchase within a 24-hour window, you get the commission — whatever it is he or she buys.
Was on the Instagram site a few weeks ago and ran across an offer for a free backpack. The ad mentioned there would be a shipping fee of $14.95. Not sure why, but I went ahead and placed an order. The shipping charge ended up being taxed, which I thought was a little strange. The backpack arrived within a week and although the shipping notification showed the order as being shipped by Fed-Ex, it was actually delivered by the USPS. Today, this company charged my credit card an additional $53.00, saying the backpack offer was really a 15 day trial and as it wasn't returned in time, they were "finalizing" the sale. Of course, the offer I found on Instagram is now long gone. I called them to complain and was talked to like I was a small child. Please avoid this company!
Great post , I do read a lot of the Nichehacks articles and this one is so true. At the moment I am in a niche I'm passionate about and yes although I am primarily using Amazon to monetize my site, I will be branching out to use other methods very soon. It frightens me to think the plug can be pulled at any time! I intent to use other affiliate programs as well as Amazon, maybe Google Adsense, I'm not sure yet, some digital products and also to build an email list.
Great article. Thanks for writing it. I am right now picking my theme and building my wordpress. I have my hosting and domain name. What I don’t get though from the article is whether you have to apply to Amazon to be an affiliate or if they accept everyone. How does that all work? Like if I build my site and post links to amazon’s products, they wouldn’t have my details to pay me my commission. Do the templates do all that for you automatically? I am finding it hard to choose one because I want one that automatically integrates the amazon products without making my blog look like a shop per se. I’m going to have a look on the amazon site to see if there’s any clues there. But I thought that was the finishing and crucial touch, which forgive me, seems missing from your well explained and detailed article.
Formaro also publishes other types of content that appeal to the shopping side of her how-to audience. “You can also do product reviews or write gift guides on creative content websites, and these can be very effective — even more so than just linking to supplies within a how-to post,” says Formaro. “Keep in mind that people are most likely not in the shopping mindset when they arrive at your blog to get a recipe or how-to instructions. But, if they come to a gift guide or product review, the mindset is definitely shopping-oriented.”
My name is Jamie Spencer and I have spent the past 5 years building money making blogs. After growing tired of the 9-5, commuting and never seeing my family I decided that I wanted to make some changes and launched my first blog. Since then I have launched lots of successful niche blogs and after selling my survivalist blog I decided to teach other people how to do the same.
Career blogger Amanda Formaro of AmandasCookin’ says “the Amazon affiliate program is a terrific fit for new bloggers, but it’s important to understand that Amazon only pays you when your readers make purchases.” Formaro emphasizes that Amazon doesn’t pay affiliates for simply listing products or ads on their site. “Amazon affiliates don’t earn money for sending visitors to Amazon or the number of Amazon ad impressions that appear on an affiliate’s website,” says Formaro. “It’s all about the sale.”
Just one thing probably you would like to update in this post is the list of themes for Amazon affiliate website. I believe 3/5 are not available in the marketplace now. So it’s little annoying when you go in search for a theme and read the whole lot of information and started liking it but later you figure out that theme is no longer available for sale.

Hayes advises, “when you’re getting started, I would highly recommend sticking to review articles, particularly roundup reviews. These are a great way ease yourself into the content creation process. During the research process, you will get a deep understanding of your audience and the types of problems they’re trying to resolve by visiting your site.”
Now, Amazon’s categories can be confusing. As you use the program, you’ll find that something that you’d consider a “Home” or “Luxury Beauty” item might be categorized at a lower rate. To be sure of the item’s commission category, check the categories listed at the top of the item page or search by category as we did here to find this Luxury Beauty item:
With ClickBank’s affiliate program, affiliates can promote vendors' products and earn huge commissions. Affiliates use a ClickBank-provided referral link called a HopLink to direct customers to the vendor's site. If a customer then purchases a product, the affiliate receives a percentage of the sale that is credited directly to their ClickBank account. Our platform features reliable tracking and commission payouts that are made on time, every time. 
Career blogger Amanda Formaro of AmandasCookin’ says “the Amazon affiliate program is a terrific fit for new bloggers, but it’s important to understand that Amazon only pays you when your readers make purchases.” Formaro emphasizes that Amazon doesn’t pay affiliates for simply listing products or ads on their site. “Amazon affiliates don’t earn money for sending visitors to Amazon or the number of Amazon ad impressions that appear on an affiliate’s website,” says Formaro. “It’s all about the sale.”
Formaro tells budding bloggers that “it can take a while to build up enough traffic to get people clicking your links, and then they still have to buy once they land on Amazon. But don’t get discouraged,” advises Formaro. “Keep creating and sharing content, and insert Amazon affiliate links for relevant and helpful products into your posts, and the sales will follow.”
Great article! Thank you. I run a podcast (The Healing Place Podcast), am finishing up a book manuscript, am a public speaker, and write a bi-weekly blog and monthly newsletter. All related to helping others along their healing journey (from traumatic events). I recently had a podcast guest ask me if I would be willing to add an affiliate link to my websites for her book. Cool. So I started researching the idea. And I came across this article. Now my interest is piqued. I love the idea of adding affiliate ads to my blog and website related to self-help, trauma recovery, etc. Many of my podcast guests have online courses, books, etc. that I would be willing to market for them as an affiliate.
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